Article
Summary

The meaning of riverine landscapes to society has evolved to serve our ever-changing needs, from harvesting and transporting resources to arenas for outdoor recreation and contemplation. From the 18th century, rivers have been important resources for industry and hydroelectric power. The objective of this study is to explore and describe the rhythms of everyday use of a river environment using multiple quantitative and qualitative methods, and to identify subjective, multiple and often competing relations. We use Lefebvre's concept of rhythmanalysis and Ingold's contextual approach as a tool for bridging scientific and methodological disciplines. Our results show a wide breadth in everyday activities and a dynamic relation between people and the river on multiple time scales. The use of the river environment appears orderly and predictable, but the wide spectrum of everyday users on different spatiotemporal scales is diverse and forms multiple rhythms at each locality. The partial lockdown in Norway in response to Covid-19 and the subsequent shifts in people's daily routines changed the rhythm of daily and weekly use patterns, and demonstrates how rhythms can change rapidly in the face of large-scale, societal agitation. We argue that rhythmanalysis is a useful analytical tool in interdisciplinary approaches to better understand the use and valuations of landscapes.


Article
Summary

Mountain areas are often subject to conflicts between different user interests and protection. The authors examine land use planning processes in Norway applied in accordance with the Planning and Building Act and the Nature Diversity Act and discuss how they might be improved. They find that although influenced by trends of decentralization, inclusion and integration, and principles for multilevel governance, the land use planning approaches for use and protection are still performed in the shadow of instrumentalism and hierarchy with little awareness of their limitations in practical use. The “communicative turn” has stimulated comprehensive participation processes, but these consensus-oriented processes have to some extent been able to handle conflicting interests. The authors conclude that in future planning it will be vital to establish common arenas as trading zones for coordinated municipal, regional and national planning, combining instrumental and communicative practices with agonistic approaches in a multilevel governance network. https://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2020.1812379


Article
Summary

This article examines how rhythmanalysis can expand understanding of the spatiotemporal features of the host-visitor interface, examining the Telemark Canal region in Norway and its rural development and heritagization processes. Part of the heritagization of the Telemark Canal is to utilize the potential of the canal as a tourist attraction in order to generate economic, social and cultural value in the broadest sense within nearby local communities. By investigating the rhythms and polyrhythms of hosts and visitors of the canal, and revealing a significant arrhythmia, we demonstrate that there is an unfulfilled potential in how travellers along the Telemark Canal contribute socially, culturally and economically to local development. The key to local economic as well as social and cultural development from tourism is in enhancing the connections between visitors and the canal's host communities. We argue that intervening through rhythms at the interface between hosts and visitors might be the key to utilizing more of the potential of value creation from canal tourism. Journal of Rural Studies, Volume 78, Pages 199-210


Article
Summary

This article addresses the dynamic and contested processes of establishing new legal arrangements in the marine bioeconomy, and spatio-legal aspects of establishing a rights system for marine bioprospecting in Norway is explored. There are great expectations from authorities and researchers that marine bioprospecting can have major effects on future economies, through innovations that would lead to producing medicine as well as food, fodder, cosmetics and other products. Vital to this process are questions regarding rights to access, collect and utilise resources, and the sharing of costs and benefits, which are potentially high at both ends of this spectrum. Currently, a state driven process aims to better regulate and control bioprospecting within areas under Norwegian jurisdiction. The present paper examines the challenging process of establishing such regulatory framework where actors struggle to gain discursive hegemony by obtaining legal backing for claims to genetic resources in the Norwegian littoral. Four discursive arguments are discerned and it is argued that knowledge and understanding about these discursive processes is of vital importance when policies for the future bioeconomy are shaped. Rights systems developed within the hegemonic discourses might ‘lock’ sectors in the bioeconomy into certain development pathways that have consequences for the potential value of the bioeconomy as an asset for the society as a whole. Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 194, 105207


Article
Summary

This article discusses how studying rhythms can help us better understand and manage spatiotemporal tensions in social-ecological landscapes, highlighting the potential of rhythmanalysis as a tool for crossing scientific and methodological borders. The empirical material is from a study of human and non-human users and uses of the highly valued Dovrefjell mountain area in Norway, with particular attention to the much-debated Snøheim Road. We take an in-depth view of Three different, but interrelated, rhythms at Dovrefjell and discuss how intervening through rhythms can be a fruitful way to approach landscape management. By simultaneously ‘listening’ to different rhythms, this approach helps us to understand and reduce spatiotemporal tensions between social, cultural and ecological uses of a landscape. Landscape Research. https://doi.org/10.1080/01426397.2018.1535652


Report

Basert på en spørreundersøkelse blant lokalbefolkningen i kommunene rundt Dovrefjell og Sunndalsfjella (n=815), finner vi at lokalbefolkningen verdsetter fjellområdet høyt. Dovrefjell og Sunndalsfjella byr på friluftsliv og naturopplevelser, samtidig som det fremstår som et aktuelt samtaletema i hverdagen. Det er med andre ord tydelig at fjellområdet bidrar til å berike lokalsamfunnene. Villreinen verdsettes svært høyt, og mange ser også ut til å akseptere å måtte tilpasse seg villreinen med tanke på vern og tilrettelegging. I forbindelse med forvaltningen har lokalbefolkningen høyest tillit til lokale fjellstyrer, og tendensen er at en lokal forvaltning av fjellområdet fremstår som viktig. Dette betyr ikke nødvendigvis at de mener at sentrale myndigheter ikke skal ha en rolle i forvaltningen.


Article
Summary

This article explores the potential for farmers to become climate citizens. Drawing on in-depth interviews, we analyse how Norwegian farmers relate to climate change in their everyday farming practises. After discussing the concepts of environmental and ecological citizenship, we propose the climate citizen approach to meet the challenges that climate change poses to agriculture. Until now, Norwegian farmers’ response to climate change has been limited. Major changes in farming practises seem unlikely without incentives from the state. A climate citizen approach can help balance a response to institutional regulations and policies with the individual moral obligation to take personal and non-reciprocal responsibility for the planet. In order to influence how farmers might incorporate climate change awareness into their everyday practises, policy makers should take existing norms and values in the agricultural community into account and adopt clear and manageable instruments to reward farmers for taking adaptive measures. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management. https://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2017.1381075


Article
Summary

In this article, we examine articulations of mobile citizenship produced through the discursive practices of state agencies, drawing in particular on a study of the contested reconfiguration of outdoor citizenship in Norway. Whilst increased participation and diversity in outdoor activities is highly valued and encouraged because of its social benefits, moral landscapes of the outdoors may be part of settling and reinforcing social differences and existing power relations. The article identifies three discursive normativities through which state officials negotiate mobility and outdoor citizenship; knowledge, skills and socialisation; engaging (with) nature; deserving (in) the outdoors. These normativities serve as a basis for a critical discussion of different aspects of outdoor movement, and how social identities interact with the citizen responsibilities assigned to different forms of mobility, such as mountain biking, skiing and walking. The article demonstrates how and why certain outdoor practices, spaces and boundaries of citizenship are both fluid and critically negotiated by the state officials. By bringing together theories of moral landscapes, mobility and citizenship, the article contributes to understandings of the politics of mobility, and particularly the theorisation of how morality works in relation to different dimensions of mobility. It also highlights how the contestation of mobile citizenship is an issue in rural as well as urban realms. Geoforum 64 (2015), 342-350


Article
Summary

This article explores the relationships between morality and landscape in the struggles over use and management of the Norwegian outfields. The outfields are appreciated and valuated by different stakeholder groups and has a range of uses, purposes and meanings, regarding natural, cultural, symbolic as well as economic resources. The article is based on studies of two areas: (1) The Dovrefjell area which has both high recreational value, locally and nationally, and is an area of great environmental significance – in particular as a vital habitat for wild reindeer and (2) The South-Sámi areas in Mid-Norway which has seen many debates and conflicts between the South-Sámi reindeer herding and other stakeholders’ urge to develop new and alternative sources of income based on the resources in the outfields. The article demonstrates how different stakeholders mobilise different moralities in the outfields, and uses the concept of moral landscapes to address these relationships between moral assessments and the landscapes of the outfields. It concerns how landscapes both shape and reflect moral values. The outfields both shape and reflect different moralities, and these relationships play a profound role in different stakeholders’ assessments of use and management of the outfields. Utmark, nr 1&2 2014


Article

In this article, we examine articulations of mobile citizenship produced through the discursive practices of state agencies, drawing in particular on a study of the contested reconfiguration of outdoor citizenship in Norway. Whilst increased participation and diversity in outdoor activities is highly valued and encouraged because of its social benefits, moral landscapes of the outdoors may be part of settling and reinforcing social differences and existing power relations. The article identifies three discursive normativities through which state officials negotiate mobility and outdoor citizenship; knowledge, skills and socialisation; engaging (with) nature; deserving (in) the outdoors. These normativities serve as a basis for a critical discussion of different aspects of outdoor movement, and how social identities interact with the citizen responsibilities assigned to different forms of mobility, such as mountain biking, skiing and walking. The article demonstrates how and why certain outdoor practices, spaces and boundaries of citizenship are both fluid and critically negotiated by the state officials. By bringing together theories of moral landscapes, mobility and citizenship, the article contributes to understandings of the politics of mobility, and particularly the theorisation of how morality works in relation to different dimensions of mobility. It also highlights how the contestation of mobile citizenship is an issue in rural as well as urban realms.


Article
Summary

In this article, we examine articulations of mobile citizenship produced through the discursive practices of state agencies, drawing in particular on a study of the contested reconfiguration of outdoor citizenship in Norway. Whilst increased participation and diversity in outdoor activities is highly valued and encouraged because of its social benefits, moral landscapes of the outdoors may be part of settling and reinforcing social differences and existing power relations. The article identifies three discursive normativities through which state officials negotiate mobility and outdoor citizenship; knowledge, skills and socialisation; engaging (with) nature; deserving (in) the outdoors. These normativities serve as a basis for a critical discussion of different aspects of outdoor movement, and how social identities interact with the citizen responsibilities assigned to different forms of mobility, such as mountain biking, skiing and walking. The article demonstrates how and why certain outdoor practices, spaces and boundaries of citizenship are both fluid and critically negotiated by the state officials. By bringing together theories of moral landscapes, mobility and citizenship, the article contributes to understandings of the politics of mobility, and particularly the theorisation of how morality works in relation to different dimensions of mobility. It also highlights how the contestation of mobile citizenship is an issue in rural as well as urban realms. Geoforum, DOI: 10.1016.j.geoforum.2014