Artikkel
Sammendrag

The dominant philosophy of private land ownership—that private property exists for the benefit of its owner and that use and ownership should be determined by market forces—is not the only philosophy in the American tradition. Classical republicanism's proprietarian perspective was equally in favor of private property, but held that private property exists for the benefit of society. This article begins by presenting the proprietarian view of private property rights, drawing on the legal scholarship where this perspective has been revived. Next, I use the case of contemporary land reform in Scotland to exemplify the rationale for this perspective. Lastly, I attempt to import the lessons of Scottish land reformers without importing their model, instead considering ways in which private land ownership might be embedded in non‐market institutions in the United States. American Journal of Economics and Sociology 77(1): 125-148


Artikkel
Sammendrag

The provision of landscape-level public goods, such as scenery or adequate wildlife habitat, requires coordination amongst many landowners whose private decisions can, in the aggregate, produce outcomes with which they themselves are unhappy. This has certainly been the case in the US state of Vermont, where a strong public preference for landscape conservation has been frustrated by a sprawling pattern of development. This paper uses a case study from one Vermont town to illustrate how problems of collective action can stand in the way of conservation of private land. The case study focuses on a community-wide survey investigating the need for landowner education and the relative importance of various incentives for conservation on private land. Results suggest that education may not be what is most needed and that when making conservation decisions, it matters to many landowners what their neighbors are doing. The practical implication is that it might be more effective to work with neighboring landowners in groups than to expect unilateral action to result from educational outreach. This paper concludes by suggesting the need to situate private land conservation in the context of community land use planning. Natural Areas Journal 37(4):556-563